Lemon Escarole Soup w/ Beef

Serves 4

Prep time: 40 minutes

Total: 50 minutes

1 pound ground beef

1/2 small onion, finely chopped

1/2 cup bread crumbs

1 large egg

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

kosher salt

6 cups chicken broth

One 14.5 oz. can cannellini beans, rinsed

2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

1 small head escarole, torn (about 8 cups)

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Combine the beef, onion, bread crumbs, egg, nutmeg, and 1/2 tablespoon salt. Shape into meatballs.

Boil in salted water until cooked through, 5 to 6 minutes.

Combine the broth, beans, garlic, and meatballs in a saucepan; bring to a boil. Stir in the escarole; reduce heat and simmer until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the lemon juice and season with 1/2 teaspoon salt.

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💚💙Health Benefits of Mediterranean Diet 💚💙

A true Mediterranean diet consists mainly of fruits and vegetables, seafood, olive oil, hearty grains, and other foods that help fight against heart disease, certain cancers, diabetes, and cognitive decline. It’s a diet worth chasing.

A traditional Mediterranean diet consisting of large quantities of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, fish and olive oil—coupled with physical activity—reduces the risk of heart disease, certain cancers, diabetes, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. More specifically:

Protecting against type 2 diabetes. A Mediterranean diet is rich in fiber, slowing down digestion and preventing huge swings in blood sugar.

Preventing heart disease and strokes. Refined breads, processed foods, and red meat are discouraged in a Mediterranean diet, and it encourages drinking red wine instead of hard liquor, which have all been linked to heart disease and stroke prevention.

Keeping you agile. The nutrients gained with a Mediterranean diet may reduce a senior’s risk of developing muscle weakness and other signs of frailty by about 70 percent.

Reducing risk of Alzheimer’s. Researchers speculate that the Mediterranean diet may improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels and overall blood vessel health—all factors that may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Halving the risk of Parkinson’s disease. In a diet containing high levels of antioxidants that prevent cells from undergoing a damaging process called oxidative stress, the risk of Parkinson’s disease is practically cut in half.

Increased longevity. When there is a reduction in developing heart disease or cancer, as in the case when you follow a Mediterranean diet, there is a 20% reduced risk of death at any age.

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Www.helpguide.org

Health Benefits of Chickpeas 💚

Chickpeas, also called garbanzo beans, belong to the legume family, which includes a variety of beans, peanuts, soybeans and lentils. Opting for legumes over foods high in saturated fat might lower your risk of heart disease, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Chickpeas also offer specific health benefits, and consuming them regularly boosts your intake of a few key nutrients.

Protein

Eating chickpeas provides you with a vegetarian-friendly source of protein, with each cup of cooked garbanzo beans containing 15 grams. Your body breaks down this protein into amino acids, and then uses them to maintain the health of your body’s tissues. Chickpeas are a source of incomplete protein, which means they do not contain every amino acid you need for good health. Make sure you combine them with other sources of protein, such as nuts, whole grains, dairy, eggs or meat to prevent an amino acid deficiency.

Fiber
Opt for chickpeas as a rich source of dietary fiber. Foods rich in fiber help keep your colon healthy — fiber helps soften stool to fight constipation. Fiber-rich foods also help control your blood sugar levels, because fiber slows down digestion, allowing sugar to move slowly from your digestive tract into your bloodstream. As a result, you’re less likely to develop a blood sugar spike after eating, and won’t experience the fatigue and irritation from a subsequent blood sugar crash. A cup of cooked chickpeas provides 12.5 grams of fiber — half of the daily fiber intake recommendation for women or one-third of of the daily fiber recommendation for men.

Manganese and Folate

Garbanzo beans also contain vitamins and minerals and significantly boost your intake of manganese and folate. The mineral manganese helps support bone development and wound healing and also helps carry out chemical reactions important to your metabolism. A 1-cup serving of chickpeas contains 1.7 milligrams of manganese, approximately 94 percent of the daily recommended intake for women, or 74 percent of the RDA for men. Folate, or vitamin B-9, aids in new cell growth and brain cell communication and protects against genetic mutations that contribute to cancer development. Eating a cup of chickpeas provides you with 282 micrograms of folate, or 71 percent of your daily folate requirements.

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/nutrients-benefits-chick-peas-garbanzo-beans-7490.html

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Grilled Flash- Marinated Steak w/ remoulade

Serves 4

Active: 15 minutes 

Total: 45 minutes 

Ingredients

2 Tbsp. Balsamic vinegar

2 Tbsp. Reduced sodium soy sauce

4 tsp. Honey

2 tsp. Olive oil

2 garlic cloves, crushed

2 (8-oz.) skirt steaks

1/4 tsp. Kosher salt

1/4 tsp. Black pepper

Directions 

1. Combine balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, honey, olive oil, and crushed garlic in a large ziplock plastic feeezer bag. Add steaks; seal bag. Turn to coat; let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Remove steaks; discard marinade.

2. Heat a grill pan over high; lightly coat using additional olive oil. Add steaks; cook to desired degree of doneness, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a cutting board; let stand 5 minutes. Cut across the grain into thin slices. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Remoulade sauce 

Serves 4

Active: 6 minutes

Total: 6 minutes

1/4 cup canola mayonnaise

1 Tbsp. 2% reduced fat milk

1 tsp finely chopped shallots

1/2 tsp finely chopped fresh flat leaf parsley

1/2 tsp while grain mustard

1/2 tsp Dijon mustard

1/2 tsp drained, rinsed, and chopped brined capers

1/4 tsp. Minced fresh tarragon

1/4 tsp. Tarragon vinegar

dash of black pepper

dash of hot sauce

1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Chill until ready to use.

Cooking Light magazine

October 2016